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Healing Broken Bones

I fractured my wrist two months ago. Once I got the cast off, I took these steps to hasten bone healing and restoration of hand strength:
Comfrey
 a) compresses with fresh leaves and/or roots, wrapped in Saranwrap, then velcro bandage, then heat pad for a few hours. You can also purchase dried comfrey leaves and roots.
 b) Dr Christopher's Tissue and Bone Ointment; check out the 400 customer reviews on Amazon here.
Comfrey is a magical plant. It's also called Knitbone. I used it years ago on cracked ribs and made me feel better instantly.
Medical Marijuana 
Another miracle: Mary's Transdermal patches -- cannabidol, CBD (the type marijuana that has healing properties, but does not get you stoned). They cost $20 each, but boy, have they worked for me. Left on for 12 hours. Took away pain. The next morning I forgot I'd had an injury. With about 5 days of these two remedies I've gone from maybe 50% to 80% of full recovery. http://www.marysmedicinals.com/
Calcium citrate and vitamin D3
My doc recommended.
Prunes
Yes, check them out. https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/2015/06/23/07152c22-1909-11e5-ab92-c75ae6ab94b5_story.html
Bone broth
I've sort of done a blitz with these treatments and it's wonderful to get my hand working again. I haven't actually gone to rehab yet, because there is so much I do naturally in my daily life with my hands that I'm not sure I need "exercises." Each day I do more.


Stretching at Your Computer

Our software StretchWare is now free. StretchWare is the ergonomic software that reminds you to stretch, developed by Bob Anderson, author of our book, Stretching.

It's a great program; every hour or two hours, or certain number of keystrokes, a Tibetan bell rings and a window pops up asking if you have time to stretch. If you do, you click okay, and the stretches pop up on the screen. When you roll your mouse over an individual stretch, instructions pop up in a window.

It works on both Mac and Windows computers. Go here to download:
http://www.shelterpub.com/stretchware/

BTW, we were kind of amazed to learn this week that our book Stretching sold 38,000 copies in China last year.

My 5000th Post!

For some years I was really into blogging. These days I post a lot less, what with doing Instagram, contributing to theshelterblog, Tumblr, Twitter, and reluctantly, Facebook. A blizzard of internet activity.

The idea is to get our "content" out in digital form to compliment our publishing of hold-in-your-hands books. All this with "build it and they will come" approach. We're working at having theshelterblog be more and more of our original material as opposed to stuff already on the web.

We've also upgraded our website in the process.

I'm also posting less because I'm immersed in production of our next book, Small Homes. Which is looking, ahem, incredibly good. This may end up being our most relevant building book ever, with a variety of simple homes and lifestyles that will give lots of people ideas and inspiration to create their own shelters.

Sure, tiny homes are wonderful and photogenic and a welcome relief from homes that are too big and expensive and rents that are too high. But small homes are relevant for way more people.

So far we've done 97 (out of approx. 200) pages. A sample we just completed today:


So onward I go with the book, posting less. But hey, 5000 posts is a body of work (along with all time history page views of 7,448,979)…

The Magic Machine From the Past

My friend Ralph said that his granddaughter had gone up into the attic and discovered a typewriter. She came running downstairs.

"Grandpa, you push this button and instantaneously a letter appears on the paper!"

Like, no waiting for the printer.

For Stones Fans Only

If I had to pick one, I guess my favorite musical genre would be the blues. Something that reaches to my most inner depths.

BUT there's just something about rock n roll that grabs me out of the blue, so to speak, every once in awhile. Gimme Shelter came on* when I was doing dishes last week, such a perfect song, one for which I have several rather deep connections.

A few notes by Keith, 2 drumbeats by Charlie then a few triplets of ooo-ooo-ooos from the girls before:
Oh, a storm is threat'ning
My very life today
If I don't get some shelter
Oh yeah, I'm gonna fade away

Then on came Let It Bleed. We all need someone to lean on. So true.

Check it out 60s R&R fans. Like every few years I listen to Blonde on Blonde or the Band's first album.
*on our very fine locsal station KWMR, which plays world-class outstsanding music

Chicken Coop & Chicken Run - $1425 - SF Bay Area

Looks pretty good.
Cape Cod Coop & Run4' x 6' x 6' (Coop)
Reclaimed Redwood Siding
3­ - 8 Chickens
Painted Metal Roof 
3) Nesting Boxes
1) Roost
2) Windows
1) Clean out Entry Door
1) Chicken Entry Door with Retractable Ladder
Coop & Run Color painted
Total foot print 6'W x 14'L x 6'H (Run & Coop)
4' feet of it underneath the sides of the coop.
1/2" Hardware Cloth. Roof and sides.
http://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/grq/5396666779.html

Coyote by roadside last night


via Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/BBDXUDcgMqB/
I've had a number of coyote encounters. They're unlike any other animals; they seem to tune into you, like they half-way want to play. Trickster of the Miwok people. Poem of Jaime de Angulo, from Coyote's Bones:
Coyote, ululating on the hill,
is it my fire that distresses you so?
Or the memories of long ago
when you were a man roaming the hills.
(Ululate=howl)

Snowboarding in Manhattan


Some NYPD cops are awesome!
From Jon Kalish

68-Year Old Downhill Skateboarder

(I believe he's 68.)
From Maren and Jack Fulton

Eric Cline's Seminar on the Collapse of Civilizations After the Bronze Age—Synopsis by Stewart Brand

"Archaeologist Cline began by declaring that the time he would most like to be transported to is the Late Bronze Age in the Mediterranean—the five centuries between 1700 and 1200 B.C.  In those centuries eight advanced societies were densely connected—Egyptians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Canaanites, Hittites, Cypriots, Minoans, and Mycenaeans.  They grew to power over two millennia, but they collapsed simultaneously almost overnight.  What happened?

The density of their connection can be learned from trade goods found in shipwrecks, from Egyptian hieroglyphs and wall paintings, and from countless well preserved clay-tablet letters written between the states.  The tin required for all that bronze (tin was the equivalent of oil today) came from Afghanistan 1,800 miles to the east.  It was one of history’s most globalized times.

In the 12th Century B.C. everything fell apart.  For Cline the defining moment was the battle in 1177 B.C. (8th Year of Ramses III) when Egypt barely defeated a mysterious army of “Sea Peoples.”  Who were they?  Do they really explain the general collapse, as historians long assumed?