• Subscribe to
    Lloyd’s Blog via RSS.
  • Check out TheShelterBlog.com
 

The Four-Masted Ship Pamir, 1905-1957

“'Pamir' was originally launched in Hamburg in 1905, she had a steel hull, a tonnage of 3020 gross, an overall length of 375 feet, a beam of 46 feet and a loaded draught of 24 feet. Her three masts stood 168 feet above the deck and the main yard was 92 feet wide. She carried a total of 50,000 square feet of sails and could reach a top speed of 16 knots, while her speed on passage was often better than 10 knots.

Pamir, a four-masted barque, was one of the famous Flying P-Liner sailing ships of the German shipping company F. Laeisz. She was the last commercial sailing ship to round Cape Horn, in 1949. By 1957 she had been outmoded by modern bulk carriers and could not operate at a profit. Her shipping consortium's inability to finance much-needed repairs or to recruit sufficient sail-trained officers caused severe technical difficulties. On 21 September 1957 she was caught in Hurricane Carrie and sank off the Azores, with only six survivors rescued after an extensive search.…"
Photo: http://i.imgur.com/GYNzpLS.jpg
Text: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pamir_(ship)

Bye-Bye Blues by the Phoebe Babo Trio

I just ran across this. I put it on the blog about 4 years ago, but the link got scrambled, so here it is again. (My mom lived to be 103.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FJ0_8mBqnA
"I was at my Mom's rest home a few weeks ago and walked in on a little lady sitting at the piano playing for the old folks. (This is in the wing for elderly and challenged residents.) It was ragtime music and great. I learned who she was and called her up. Did she want me with my bass and my brother with his banjo to sit in with her? "Oh, yes, that would be great!"

This is the 2nd time we've played together. Lew taped this last Tuesday, and the joint was rockin'. (We haven't even practiced together yet.) These are songs that I used to play with my quartet in high school, a lot of them from the '20s, so I was right at home. I'm working at my bass playing and Bob is pretty good on the banjo.

Phoebe is actually thrilled. I told her we're just enhancing her. I'm calling us the Phoebe Babo trio. She says when she was a girl, she played the drums. She started on the piano later on in life, and she's just got it. She is a grand lady. The 80-90-year-olds love us. On Tuesday, as soon as we started playing, people came in from all over. The caregiver women were dancing, my mom's caregiver Clara was shakin' it. A lady named Jane knows the words to every song. Peggy was 88 that day and celebrating with wolf whistles at the end of each song."

The Motoped Survival Bike: "…baddass TreeHugger alternative to a car. "

"So why is this on TreeHugger? Well, The Motoped Survival is a motor-assisted bicycle that gets up to 160 miles to the gallon, and the 49CC motor will take it up to 500 miles on a three gallon fill-up. It has racks and tie-on points that can carry a lot of gear when it's bug-out time, and it is a whole lot easier than pushing a shopping cart like Viggo had to do in The Road.
It's not a horrible polluter like my old two-stroke Solex moped was; with its Smart Carb fuel system, the manufacturer claims that you can reduce your carbon footprint by as much as 70% compared to the usual small engine in recreational products. At 120 pounds it is a lot heavier than a regular bike, but you can still pedal it.…"

"…Or you could just go camping, or have the coolest looking moped in town. I know I am being totally TreeHugger incorrect here, but this is a thing of beauty, and looks quite practical. Yes, an electric bike is greener but there's no range anxiety here. And at 160 MPG with low emissions, it's a baddass TreeHugger alternative to a car. It's also a thing of beauty at $2499."

http://www.treehugger.com/bikes/i-so-want-motoped-survival-bike.html

Seven Houseboats

On this (thankfully) rainy morning, I'm at the v. cool Prooflab Coffee House in Mill Valley and was fiddling around on TheShelterBlog on my MacAir, fast wi-fi, did a search under "Nomadic - Boats" and came up with these 7 boats.

http://www.theshelterblog.com/category/nomadic-homes/boats/

 We're building this blog day by day, new post every day, 7/365 -- and it gets better every week.

In Praise of Eudora (and in Sorrow at Its Non-Availability Today For Mac Users)

Two and a half years ago, I did a post on Eudora, and it has generated 19 comments over that time. There still seems to be no solution for anything near as good that will run on the new Mac operating systems. I'm still using Snow Leopard (10.6.8) on my office MacPro for the sake of Eudora. I occasionally give silent thanks to Steve Dorner for developing Eudora back in the '90s. He thought so many things out so well.
Old article on Steve Dorner: http://www.nytimes.com/library/cyber/week/012197eudora.html

Why doesn't some venture capitalist put up the money (hire Dorner?) to create a mail program as good as Eudora that will run on new Macs? There's a huge gaping hole in quality still.

The following comment came in today and I think it's interesting enough to bring it to the forefront:

Lloyd’s Camping Vehicles, Part 3

In 1988 I bought a 4-cylinder, 5-speed Tacoma 4×4 with the Xtra cab (meaning a 6′ bed). Then in 2003, I got a new one, same model. The engine is a bit gutless going up long hills, but will run forever.
By this time I knew exactly what I wanted:
A metal camper shell made by Tradesman in Winters, Calif. It opened on all three sides, was way stronger than plastic shells. I bought an aluminum rack from Hauler Racks. It came disassembled via UPS and I bolted it together and mounted it. It rests on the truckbed sides, not on the camper roof.
At Campway’s in Santa Rosa, Calif., I got the inside of the bed sprayed with a waterproof membrane to protect the metal. Also a “carpet kit,” with storage boxes along the sides and sliding middle panels inside the bed.
You can see the pull-out drawer and side storage boxes. I shot this photo on Hornby Island, BC on one of my four trips to Canada shooting photos for Builders of the Pacific Coast. I remember one afternoon collecting oysters way out on a reef (beyond the commercial guys and cooking them for dinner on a beach fire with aluminum-foil-clad potatoes, red wine, AND just-picked blackberries with …(ahem)… heavy cream and brown sugar.
More on TheShelterBlog here.

ELF Solar Powered Electric Vehicles From Organic Transit

"…The ELF is a solar and pedal hybrid vehicle powered by you and the sun. 'The most efficient vehicle on the planet,' it is a revolution in transportation and gets the equivalent of 1800 MPG.

Hand built in the USA, the ELF is legally a bicycle, so it can travel on bike paths, park on sidewalks and requires no gas, license, registration or insurance.

It can travel up to 20 mph on electric power only and up to 30 mph when combined with pedaling. It can hold more than a dozen bags of groceries and can handle an amazing 350 lb. payload.…"

Comprehensive review of Elf by Sami Grover in Treehugger here.

Above text from http://organictransit.com/

A New Pesticide Monster by Dow Chemical

There was a PBS news story on TV last night about USA corn and soybean farming. Seems that in the brilliant GMO scheme of Roundup-tolerant seeds, that Roundup (brought to us by Monsanto) is no longer killing weeds, especially the aggressive weed waterhemp. SO Dow Chemical (who manufactured napalm for the Vietnam war AND owners of Union carbide, responsible for the Bhopal disaster) has come up with an even more brilliant scheme: "Duo," an herbicide composed of glysophosate + 2,4 D, one of the components of Agent Orange PLUS the seeds to plant and spray with this toxic mix.

This is a chilling story of greedy multinational corporations not only controlling food production, but poisoning land, plus most likely consumers in the process.

I can't believe it.

The de Young Museum in San Francisco - Horse's Ass Architecture

Not only is this an ugly building, but it is covered with 165,000 sq. ft. of copper -- what a waste!

Light at End of Tunnel Has Faded

Someone sent me this a few weeks back and, although I didn't agree with everything (like the internet being mostly evil), it hit a lot of notes compatible with what I've seen going on. Since the depressing elections, Don Hazen's summary seems even more true.

I usually don't publish political stuff here because I don't have time to engage in political debate, but what this guy says is pretty much what I see going on.

"…we progressives, liberals, common-sense people, are losing badly to the conservative business state, the tyranny of massively expanding tech companies, theocratic right-wing forces and pervasive militarism, home and abroad. By virtually every measure, things are getting worse. And things are trending much, much worse in ways we can easily measure, like inequality, climate, militarization of police forces, etc., and in ways that are more psychological and emotional.…"

"…the four especially powerful and pernicious overarching economic and political mechanisms operating in our country that are fundamentally responsible for the situation we are in. They are privatization, financialization, militarization and criminalization, which together are producing a steadily creeping authoritarianism—a new authoritarianism—to fit our times.…"

Apocalypse Now: Seriously, It's Time for a Major Rethink About Liberal and Progressive Politics We are losing badly to the corporate state. Here's what we need to do.
By Don Hazen
October 25, 2014

The Basement Tapes Complete: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11

Just out. Boy is there some good stuff here (also, some half-finished, raw songs). These guys were having fun!
Like an Amazon reviewer wrote, "This is history, babe…."
Photo I took of Dylan with Robbie Robertson in one of his first concerts with rock and roll, in Providence, RI, in Fall, 1967. Full account of this concert here.
http://grooveshark.com/s/I+Don+t+Hurt+Anymore/78dLLs?src=5 http://grooveshark.com/s/This+Wheel+s+On+Fire/78dKfg?src=5

Lloyd’s Camping Vehicles, Part 2

These days I'm doing less posts on this blog and more on TheShelterBlog. I realized that I had a lot of build-garden-homestead-forage experience (and assemblage) to communicate and liked the idea of putting it all in one place.

I'll cross-reference some of my posts on the new blog with this one, such as this:
I bought it used from a builder friend. It didn’t have the “Xtra cab,” so the bed was 8′ long.
Tarp for Shade:  I had a Yakima Rocket Box on racks on the camper roof, with a flea market tarp (12’×14′) folded up inside. The frame was 1″ electrical conduit, with special connectors tightenable with wingscrews. The tarp was aluminized fabric. It was weighted down with canvas bags filled with sand and hung from each corner (ingenious!). Took maybe 45 minutes to set up. I’d place it butting up to the truck bed.

I'm Doing Tiny Homes on the Move Presentation Tonight in Pt. Reyes Station, Calif.

It's sponsored by Pt. Reyes Books and will be at 7:30 PM, Friday November 7th at the Presbyterian church in Pt. Reyes. I'll also be talking about my early years in building and publishing, and passing out copies of our Tiny Homes on the Move mini-book (2" x 2").

The above photo is in the November 6th issue of the Pt. Reyes Light, along with a description of our greenhouse and my background.

I was lucky to have master photographer Art Rogers shoot this photo. Art works with real film and large-format cameras.

Vintage German Vehicle

I just discovered this old postcard in a drawer. On the back it says "(c) Kulturrecycling." Looks like it's probably foot-powered.

My Camping Vehicles, Part 1


This is a 3-part series I'm putting up on TheShelterBlog here.

Coyotes Singing in Full Moon

Actually 2 days before the full moon, but it was bright last night. I headed out on my usual Tuesday night solo run—well, vigorous hike is more like it. Beach beautiful, with a 100-foot long glistening inland pond in moonlight, no one there, I had one of those almost chilling moments, surrounded by such beauty, alone, waves breaking, negative ions up the kazoo, super energizing of chi

I started out in a down parka and gloves, brrrr…I don't feel like going out into the cold night, but as always, the heart likes to pump, and pretty soon I take off the parka and gloves and climb the hills in a t-shirt. Circulation, circulation, circulation…

As I came back down into the valley, a coyote startled me. It was so close, and so beautiful. There were 2 of them close by and another at a distance. They were singing. Totally. One did a yodel, starting high, then breaking voice down to lower sustained note. Then a distant coyote would respond. Oh my!

I heard this about Australian aborigines: the smoke signals don't contain the message. Rather, they're a notice to a group maybe a few miles away to tune into psychic forces and get a telepathic message. Wow!

On the way home, moonlight streaming across the ocean, on Little Steven's Underground Garage (Sirius): "Beautiful Delilah" by the Kinks, followed by Chuck Berry doing same (his) song. http://grooveshark.com/s/Beautiful+Delilah/2725La?src=5

Skulls Exhibit, Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

"The skulls on display in the Academy's 4,000-square-foot second-floor Forum Theater and Gallery range from an enormous African bull elephant to a tiny bat, from frogs and fish to giraffes and walruses. There are interactive displays that simulate the vision of predator and prey, and allow visitors to be hands-on with cast skulls. Another part of the exhibit shows live dermestid beetle larvae cleaning delicate bones (the larvae can scour the flesh of a small skull in three days). And there is an interactive 3-D display developed by Google that allows visitors to view skulls from various angles.
"A skull provides important information about a species' evolution and reveals secrets about that individual animal's life," said Moe Flannery, collections manager of ornithology and mammalogy at the academy.
Walking through the exhibit, Flannery added, "By searching for clues written in the bone, we can follow the story of an animal's life, from birth to old age. We can learn what the animal ate, how it defended itself, communicated, interacted with its environment, and often how it died - all by looking at its skull.…"
  -SFGate
 400 sea lion skulls mounted here are "…only a fraction of those in storage…"





Another Toot With Louie in San Francisco

No, no, a different kinda toot: see http://lloydkahn-ongoing.blogspot.com/2013/02/a-toot-in-san-francisco.html.
Louie and I went over in the morning, went to the Cliff House Bistro at the beach. got a couple of Irish Coffees at the bar, then a great breakfast sitting at an ocean-view table AND the surf was big. There were maybe 50 surfers out, peaks everywhere, and everyone was getting rides. "We're in 'em," said Louie as breakfast was served, a salmon fishermen's expression for being in the midst of a school of salmon.

We went into the unique vintage camera obscura (anyone see "Tim's Vermeer" documentary?), then to the Academy of Sciences in the park to see the spectacular "Skulls" exhibit, then dinner that night at Camino, the wood-fired restaurant in Oakland. For desert we stopped at Mel's on Lombard, split an, ahem, chocolate malt, and played Otis Redding on the juke box. We're so bad.